Minimally invasive removal of a spinal tumour

This is a video of the minimally invasive removal of a spinal tumour called a schwannoma, which was compressing the thoracic part of the spinal cord and causing walking difficulty. The spine was accessed through a minimally invasive surgical portal (an expandable cylinder) and the tumour was removed under the surgical microscope, using microsurgical instruments.

The tumour was removed entirely, decompressing the spinal cord. The patient was up walking the following morning and home after three days

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Minimally invasive removal of a spinal tumour

This is a video of the minimally invasive removal of a spinal tumour called a schwannoma, which was compressing the thoracic part of the spinal cord and causing walking difficulty. The spine was accessed through a minimally invasive surgical portal (an expandable cylinder) and the tumour was removed under the surgical microscope, using microsurgical instruments.